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QUIZ: How much do you know about indigenous peoples?

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To celebrate the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, we’re asking you what you know about indigenous communities across the globe! How well will you do?

Minority Rights Group has been working with indigenous communities in order to secure their rights for over 50 years. We believe that the first step to supporting indigenous rights is to stay informed on who they are, where they live, their cultures and the challenges they face. Learn more by taking a look at our World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples.

When is the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples?

Portrait of Patricia Gualinga, an indigenous rights defender of the Pueblo Kichwa de Sarayaku, an indigenous community in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Credit: Amazon Watch.
Correct! Wrong!

It was first pronounced by the United Nations General Assembly in 1994 and marks the day of the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights, in 1982. More info >.

What country has the highest number of indigenous languages?

Taiwani Bunun elders. Credit: Dani Hazamann.
Correct! Wrong!

Despite having a population of around 8.7 million, there are 840 languages spoken in the country. The countries with the second, third and fourth highest number of languages are Indonesia, Nigeria and India. More info >.

Roughly how many indigenous people are there in the world?

Martha Akal, a Turkana mother of three children, herds her goats in the village of Kache Imeri, Northern Kenya, in the midst of a severe drought. In the absence of safe drinking water and food, pastoralists are extremely vulnerable to disease and famine. Credit: Panos / Frederic Courbet.
Correct! Wrong!

There are over 476 million indigenous people in the world, which is 6.2 per cent of the global population. More info >.

In Uganda, the Batwa are indigenous and originally a forest dwelling people. The vast majority of them are unable to live in their forest anymore. Why?

Credit: Julie Ricard / Unsplash.
Correct! Wrong!

The drastic change to their lifestyle, along with their small number and despised status, has brought the Ugandan Batwa close to being wiped out. Find out more about Batwa in Uganda in our World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples.

Which one of the below is a collective name used for the many indigenous peoples of India?

Rural Dalit neighbourhood, Tamil Nadu, India. Credit: Emma Eastwood / MRG.
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The term Adivasi derives from the Hindi word ‘adi‘ which means of earliest times or from the beginning and ‘vasi‘ meaning inhabitant or resident. Afar people live in Eritrea and Ethiopia and Abkhaz people live in Georgia. Read more about all these communities in in our World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples.

What percentage of Adivasis still live in rural areas?

Birhor man inside his house at Itchak resettlement camp for formerly nomadic communities. Birhor are traditional hunters and gatherers and do not practice pastoral cultivation like other Adivasi communities. Lacking title deeds for land on which they have farmed and hunted for millennia, the rural adivasi communities are being displaced to make way for new industrial developments planned to capitalise on the land's mineral wealth. Credit: Panos Pictures.
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Most Adivasi communities live in rural areas but the situation of Adivasi forest dwellers remains precarious, especially with continued pressure to open up forest land for mining and other activities.

Yanomami are one of the largest communities of hunter gatherers living in the Amazonian rainforest. They usually live in Brazil and what other neighbouring country?

A child from the indigenous Yanomami ethnic group holds a protective face mask, amid the spread of COVID-19, at the 4th Surucucu Special Frontier Platoon of the Brazilian army in the municipality of Alto Alegre, state of Roraima, Brazil, July 2020. Credit: Reuters / Adriano Machado.
Correct! Wrong!

The Yanomami inhabit the Orinoco and Sierra Parima region of southern Venezuela as well as the Amazonian region of Brazil. Read more about Yanomami communities in Venezuela here.

In Australia, tens of thousands of indigenous children were forcibly removed from their families over generations until 1970, known as the Stolen Generations. In what year did Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd offer an apology on behalf of the country?

An Indigenous Muruwari elder, Rita, a member of the 'Stolen Generations', is seen at home with her son who is ill with kidney failure, in Sydney, Australia. Credit: Alamy
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While Tasmania is both the smallest state and has the smallest Aboriginal population, the move was strongly supported by Aboriginal groups throughout the country as a model for reconciliation and a means of revitalisation of debate and action on reconciliation. The statement was described as a ‘watershed moment’ and stated: ‘For the pain, suffering and hurt of these Stolen Generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.’

How much do you know about the world’s indigenous peoples?
You’re at the beginning of your learning journey!

Why not use our World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples or read some of our blogs to find out more about indigenous peoples across the world?
















    Click here to support our work with indigenous peoples across the world by making a donation.
    Not bad!

    Try using our World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples or read some of our blogs to find out more about indigenous peoples across the world.
















      Click here to support our work with indigenous peoples across the world by making a donation.
      Well done!

      Stay up to date on our work with indigenous peoples by signing up to our monthly newsletter below, and keep learning!
















        Click here to support our work with indigenous peoples across the world by making a donation.
        Congratulations!

        You got full marks! Stay up to date on our work with indigenous peoples by signing up to our monthly newsletter below, and keep learning!
















          Click here to support our work with indigenous peoples across the world by making a donation.

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          Thumbnail photo: A Turkana girl walks away from a waterhole near Lodwar, in Turkana County, Kenya. Credit: Reuters/Baz Ratner.

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