Minority
and Indigenous
Trends 2020

Minority
and Indigenous
Trends 2020

Technology increasingly permeates every aspect of our lives, from the use of big data to information and communication technologies (ICTs) to artificial intelligence (AI) and automation. These developments are often framed around issues such as efficiency, speed and innovation, but for minorities, indigenous peoples and other marginalized groups there are often very different forces at play – the replication of existing patterns of exclusion in new forms.

Technology increasingly permeates every aspect of our lives, from the use of big data to information and communication technologies (ICTs) to artificial intelligence (AI) and automation. These developments are often framed around issues such as efficiency, speed and innovation, but for minorities, indigenous peoples and other marginalized groups there are often very different forces at play – the replication of existing patterns of exclusion in new forms.

Foreword

By E. Tendayi AchiumeUN Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia and related intolerance

Read >>

Foreword

By E. Tendayi AchiumeUN Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia and related intolerance

Read >>

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

Executive Summary

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

Recommendations

Thematic Chapters

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

The threats of technology to minority and indigenous rights

The global ‘digital divide’ continues to prevent ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities and indigenous peoples from accessing the internet and associated information and communication technologies (ICTs) that may support peace, democracy and the promotion of human rights. Sadly, patterns of exclusion and discrimination in everyday life are mirrored online; the United Nations (UN) reports that nearly half the world’s population is not connected to the internet, while the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates that the proportion of women using the internet is 12 per cent lower than that of men. By Michael Caster.

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

The threats of technology to minority and indigenous rights

The global ‘digital divide’ continues to prevent ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities and indigenous peoples from accessing the internet and associated information and communication technologies (ICTs) that may support peace, democracy and the promotion of human rights. Sadly, patterns of exclusion and discrimination in everyday life are mirrored online; the United Nations (UN) reports that nearly half the world’s population is not connected to the internet, while the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates that the proportion of women using the internet is 12 per cent lower than that of men. By Michael Caster.

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

Empowering minorities and indigenous peoples through tech

Advances in technology are revolutionizing the way communities and advocates are working to realize indigenous and minority rights. Despite the many ways that technology is being used to reinforce and exacerbate inequality — through, for example, surveillance and discriminatory artificial intelligence — civil society is using the same tools to decentralize power and destabilize established systems of oppression. By Nicole Girard.

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

Empowering minorities and indigenous peoples through tech

Advances in technology are revolutionizing the way communities and advocates are working to realize indigenous and minority rights. Despite the many ways that technology is being used to reinforce and exacerbate inequality — through, for example, surveillance and discriminatory artificial intelligence — civil society is using the same tools to decentralize power and destabilize established systems of oppression. By Nicole Girard.

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

The challenges of technology and sustainable development

While technological advances have been linked to patterns of destructive unsustainable development, including the direct impacts of mining and other extractive industries on communal lands, they also offer new tools that open up the possibility of an alternative future. Indeed, in their widest definition, technologies are innovations developed to enhance living and social conditions, including health, well-being and the environment. By Carolyn Stephens.

Minority and Indigenous Trends 2020

The challenges of technology and sustainable development

While technological advances have been linked to patterns of destructive unsustainable development, including the direct impacts of mining and other extractive industries on communal lands, they also offer new tools that open up the possibility of an alternative future. Indeed, in their widest definition, technologies are innovations developed to enhance living and social conditions, including health, well-being and the environment. By Carolyn Stephens.

Case Studies

Africa

Americas

Asia and Oceania

Europe

Middle East and North Africa